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October Crop Report

Contributed by: Christy Hicks, Regional Extension Agent, Agronomic Crops

Upcoming Events

October 17-19 Farm Expo Moultrie, GA

November 3-12 National Peanut Festival, Dothan

November 30 Precision Planter Clinic, EV Smith REC

December 3-4 AL Farmers Federation Annual Meeting, Montgomery

December 12-13 – Auburn University Row Crop Short Course

 

East Central Alabama Corn Trial Results

Trial was planted March 30th and harvested September 9th.  Plant pop was 30K planted on 38” rows.  Field was irrrigated, Wickham silt loam soil.  250 lbs/ac of N, 120 lbs/ac P and 110 lbs/ac K.  No till.

 

Variety Yield (bu/ac)
D57VC51 (DynaGro) 255.58
DKC 70-27 (DeKalb) 253.97
P 1197 (Pioneer) 249.89
P 1870 (Pioneer) 246.54
DKC 68-26 (DeKalb) 244.94
A6711 (AgriGold) 244.07
A6572 (AgriGold) 230.26
D54DC94 (DynaGro) 222.76

 Cotton Defoliation

I wallked several cotton fields recentlyh where a decision will need to be made on whether or not to wait on the top bolls to mature.  After the wind and rain, the botton and middle crop will  not hold as long as we hoped in some fields.  Here are a few thoughts to consider:

According to the 10 day forcast this morning, we have 6 more days with highs in the 80’s.  After that we can expect highs in the 70’s and lows in the mid to upper 50’s.  Keep in mind the minimum temperature at which a cotton plant will grow is 600F.  Once the temperatures drop, the plant will not accumulate many Heat Units, for example if we have a high of 73 and a low of 58, the cotton plant will accumulate ((73 + 53)/2) – 60 = 3 heat units.  If the plant does not accumulate heat units, all physiological processes associated with boll maturity occur at an extremely slow pace.

Fruit set during the first 4 weeks of bloom normally contribute to 90-95% of the total yield of the cotton crop.  Under good growing conditions, ten mature bolls per foot of row produce a bale of cotton per acre.  More bolls are needed if they are higher on the plant; fewer if they are lower on the plant.  Counts should include (1) open bolls, including cracked (2) green bolls that are mature and string out when cut with a knife (3) immature bolls that are harvestable.  Bolls maturing late in the season when temps are lower usually produce less lint often of lower quality.

Cotton quality is determined by the genetic makeup of specific varieties, environmental conditions and management of the crop.  The table below gives us an idea of what is controlled by genetics verses environmental conditions.

 

Genetic % Environment %
Staple 82 18
Micronaire 41 59
Color 21 79
Strength 90 10

 

Christy Hicks

Regional Extension Agent

EV Smith Research Center

334-704-3370

agnewcd@auburn.edu