Upcoming Events



2017 Marion County 4-H Pet Show

4-H Pet Show

Marion County 4-H Pet Show

When? October 14th, 2017 Starting at 9:00AM-Until

Where? Tractor Supply Company Store 1500 Military St S #1, Hamilton, AL 35570

View Photos from the 2016  Event: https://www.facebook.com/pg/marioncountyal4h/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1618442285116035

Flyer: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/2017-4-H-Pet-Show-Flyer.pdf

PET SHOW DIVISIONS AND CATEGORIES TO ENTER:

DOGS 

_____ Costume Contest

______Largest

_____Smallest (adult, no puppies)

CATS

_____ Costume Contest

______Largest

_____Smallest (adult, no kittens)

RABBITS

_____ Costume Contest

______Largest

_____Smallest (adult)

BIRDS

_____Best Color

_____Most Vocal

_____Largest

FISH

_____Best Color

_____Most Unusual

OTHER PETS

_____Most Unusual

_____Most Like Owner

_____Costume Contest

 

Marion County 4-H Pet Show RULES

1. All pets MUST be in cages or restrained on a leash.

2. Youth CAN bring up to 3 pets.

3. Youth/animal MUST sign in upon arrival. Any youth ages 9-18 are welcome to participate. Show up before 9:00am to register.

4. Check the website/social media pages or call the Extension Office for location and times of the event.

5. No wildlife or farm animal of any kind will be permitted on site.

6. All animals must be healthy and show no signs of sickness or disease.

7. No aggressive behavior will be tolerated. If your animal cannot be controlled you will be asked to leave.

8. Each pet entry will be evaluated based upon how close the pet meets the subcategory standards.

9. All judges’ decisions are final.

10. All participants MUST be prepared to talk to the judges about their pets.

11. There must be a minimum of two entries per class in a division OR the class will be cancelled.

12. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System, Marion County 4-H, and Hamilton Tractor Supply Company Store will not be held responsible for any accident or loss that may occur to any animal, person, or vehicle, nor damage to any property.

13. In case of rain or inclement weather the show will be held at the Hamilton Recreation Center Pavilion across from the Marion County Courthouse Annex where the Extension office is located.
Call or Email the 4-H Agent is you have any questions (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: Marion County Humane Society

Marion County 4-H is partnering with the Marion County Humane Society for this year’s 4-H Community Service Project. Please consider helping this worthy organization by bringing some of the items from the list below or provide monetary donations to this organization. If you can’t give items you can always give of your time. Contact the Marion County Humane Society to see how you can help today! (205) 924-3648  or mchsteammember@gmail.com Marion County 4-H will have bins set up at the 4-H Pet Show scheduled for October 14th ready to take your items to the Humane Society.  The 4-H Agent will also bring a list of items to each 4-H in-school meeting to help collect items for the Humane Society.

Items you can Donate to help:

Collars, Harnesses, Puppy Food, Kitten Food, Kitty Litter, Cedar Shavings, Dog Toys, Cat Toys, Bleach, Laundry Detergent, Crate Liners, Dog/Cat beds, Treats, Dog Houses-used or new, and Monetary gifts are always welcome to help purchase pet medications and needed supplies.

 

**Check our website (www.aces.edu) Facebook , Instagram, or Twitter Pages to stay up to date on all Marion County 4-H News and Events. Call/email your 4-H Agent with any questions: Mrs. Danley (205)921-3551 or  rgd0007@aces.edu

Youth Council Meeting October 3rd, 2017 5:30pm

 

Are you interested in Leadership? Come to our first Marion County 4-H Youth Council Meeting of the 2017-2018 4-H Club Year! This year’s Youth Council will plan upcoming 4-H events and activities, participate in Leadership activities, conduct community service projects, and brainstorm fun games/activities to include at this year’s 4-H County Round-Up in April! Youth Council members will serve as Marion County 4-H Ambassadors that promote 4-H in the schools and at local events. We will elect youth council officers that will preside at County Round-Up at our first meeting. Refreshments will be served.

When: Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017 5:30pm (please call/email by Friday, September 29th to reserve your spot)

Where: Marion County Extension Office 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570 (across the street from the Hamilton Recreation Center)

If you would like to attend this Leadership Event please call/email the 4-H Agent by Friday, September 29th, so that we can better prepare! We hope to see you on October 3rd!

Marion County Extension Office Hours 7:30am-4:00pm Monday-Friday

Address: 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570

4-H Agent, Rebecca Danley (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

Tailgating Food Safety 2017 – Stay in the Zone

Tailgating Food Safety 2017 Stay in the Zone

Maintain your playing field

Bring enough coolers to keep your food safe.

  •   A cooler for raw foods and a cooler for cooked foods

Stick to the game plan

  • Keep your food prep area clean
  • Keep your food and equipment separate
  • Cook your foods to the correct temperature
  • Keep your foods chilled

Defend against bacteria

Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold

Use a food thermometer to check temperatures

Put your food away after two hours

To win the game

  • When in doubt throw it out

 Chicken Taco Soup

Ingredients:

1 pound boneless skinless chicken, cooked and shredded
2 cups cooked pinto beans
2 cups prepared salsa
6 cups chicken stock
1 packet taco seasoning
2 cups tortilla chips, crushed

2 cups shredded cheese for topping(optional)

Directions:

1. Combine chicken, beans, salsa, stock and seasoning in a 2 quart soup pot.
2. Bring to a boil and reduce heat until soup is simmering.
3. Let cook for 15 to 20 minutes so flavors blend well.
4. Top each bowl of soup with crushed tortilla chips.

ANGEL FLUFF CAKE

Ingredients:

1 can (20 oz.) Crushed Pineapple, in juice, undrained

2 pkg.  small (1.5 oz.) Pistachio Flavor Fat Free Sugar Free Instant Pudding

1 cup thawed LITE or Sugar Free Whipped Topping

1pkg.  (10 oz.) round angel food cake, cut horizontally into 3 layers

10  fresh strawberries or frozen sliced strawberries

Directions:

MIX pineapple and dry pudding mix in medium bowl with whisk until well blended. Stir in whipped topping.

STACK cake layers on plate, filling layers and topping with pudding mixture.

REFRIGERATE 1 hour. Top with berries just before serving.  (Source:KRAFT.com)

 

Caramel Apple Nachos

Ingredients

3 green granny smith apples, cored and sliced

3 red apples, cored and sliced
5 oz. caramel topping

5 oz. chocolate topping
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
2 Tablespoons mini chocolate chips

Directions

  1. PLACE SLICED APPLES ON A PLATTER OF CHOICE
    2.  Drizzle caramel TOPPING AND CHOCOLATE TOPPING OVER SLICED APPLES
    3.  Sprinkle with chopped peanuts and mini chocolate chips
  2. MICROWAVE FOR 15-20 SECONDS ONLY
  3. SERVE

EASY MARASCHINO CHERRY FRUIT DIP

INGREDEINTS

1  8 OZ. PACKAGE OF CREAM CHEESE, SOFTENED

1 16 OZ. CONTAINER MARSHMALLOW CREAM

1 TABLESPOON MARASCHINO CHERRY JUICE

DIRECTIONS

  1. PLACE CREAM CHEESE AND MARSHMALLOW CREAM IN A  LARGE MIXING BOWL
  2. MIX WITH ELECTIRIC OR HAND HELD MIXER
  3. ADD MARASCHINO CHERRY JUICE
  4. MIX BY HAND
  5. EMPTY DIP INTO SERVING DISH OR INDIVIDUAL DISHES
  6. SERVE

BACON TATOR BOMBS

INGREDIENTS

1 SMALL BAG TATOR TOTS; THAWED

1 PACKAGE THIN SLICED BACON

1 CUP SHREDDED CHEDDAR CHEESE MILD OR SHARP

DIRECTIONS

  1. PREHEAT OVEN TO 400º
  2. POUR TATOR TOTS INTO A LARGE BOWL
  3. REMOVE BACON FROM PACKAGE
  4. SEPARATE EACH SLICE OR BACON
  5. CUT EACH BACON SLICE IN HALF
  6. PLACE ONTO A COOKIE SHEET OR BAKING DISH
  7. PLACE TATOR TOT AT ONE END OF A SLICE OF BACON
  8. WRAP BACON AROUND TATOR TOT
  9. REPEAT UNTIL TATOR TOTS ARE WRAPPED
  10. BAKE WRAPPED TOTS AND BACON FOR 15 MINUTES OR UNTIL BACON IS CRISPY
  11. CAREFULL REMOVE BACON WRAPPED TOTS FROM BAKING SHEET AND PLACE ONTO SERVING PLATTER
  12. SPRINKLE SHREDDED CHEESE ONTOP BACON WRAPPED TOTS
  13. SERVE

YUMMY VEGETABLE DIP VEGETABLE TRAY WITH CHEESE

INGREDIENTS

1 PACKAGE VEGETABLE MIX OF CHOICE

½ CUP MAYONNAISE OR PLAIN YOGURT

1 16OZ CONTAINER SOUR CREAM (REGULAR, LOWFAT, OR FAT FREE)

DIRECTIONS

  1. MIX ALL INGREDIENTS IN A MEDIUM MIXING BOWL
  2. SET ASIDE

INGREDIENTS

1 LARGE GREEN PEPPER

1 PACKAGE BROCOLLI FLOWERETTES

1 PACKAGE CAULIFLOWERETTES

1 SMALL BAG BABY CARROTS

2 SLICED CUCUMBERS

2 SMALL CONTAINERS GRAPE TOMATOES

4 CELERY STALKS CUT INTO 3 INCH PIECES

2 BAGS CUBED CHEDDAR CHEESE

1 BAG SNOW PEAS

2017 4-H Sweet Potato Fundraiser

40 lb. box-$20 

Download ORDER Form: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/SweetPotatoFlyerHLE.pdf

Pre-orders only. Deadline to order is November 1st, 2017.  Make checks/money orders payable to Alabama 4-H Foundation when you place your order. Checks or money orders preferred. Pick-up from November 16-17 at the Marion County Extension Office 7th Avenue SW, Hamilton, AL 35570.

The 4-Her with the most sales will win a cash prize!

Drop by the Marion County Extension Office to place an order or you may mail your order to the Extension Office (payment in the mail by October 27th).

For more information call or email the 4-H Agent at (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu . Office Hours Monday-Friday 7:30am-4:00pm Address: 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570.

All proceeds go toward educational programming for 4-H in-school clubs and 4-H Events (RiverKids, Shooting Sports, Pet Show, Etc.).  

 

September 4-H Newsletter

Check out the September 4-H Newsletter to see what’s coming up for Marion County 4-H’ers: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/09/September-2017-4-H-Newsletter.pdf

Contact the Marion County Extension Office (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu for questions.

2017 Farm City Poster, Essay, and Multimedia Contest

Marion County Rules: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/Combined-Rules-1.pdf

State Rules: http://alabamafarmcity.org/

County Prizes Provided by the Marion County ALFA Farmer’s Federation

1st Place $50.00

2nd Place $25.00

3rd Place $15.00

**ALL submissions must be made to the Marion County Extension Office by October 31st, 2017. The Marion County Farm City Committee will select the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners. 1st Place work will be submitted by the Marion County Committee for state submission. **

DUE: October 31st, 2017 to the Marion County Extension Office.

The Alabama Farm-City Committee is excited once again to offer a Multimedia Contest, Poster Contest and Essay Contest to Marion County Youth. The contest is sponsored by Alabama Farmers Cooperative and complements the Farm-City poster and essay contests by providing students another channel to express their creativity. The 2017 theme for all three contests is “Agriculture: Food for Life.” The 2017 National Ag Day and Farm-City Week theme of “Agriculture: Food for Life” captures the essence of farming. No other industry or activity is more connected to “life” than agriculture. Farmers produce the grains, protein, fruit, vegetables, nuts and dairy products that sustain life. The food we eat is literally fuel for our bodies. Without it, life would be unsustainable. But agriculture is intertwined to “life” in other ways, too. Private farms and forestland provide habitat and food for wildlife, and support the lives of all nature’s creatures. Through conservation and environmental stewardship, farmers protect the life-giving water, air and soil on which we all depend. Life, however, is not merely a physical existence. It’s also emotional and spiritual experiences, working together to provide a healthy, well-balanced life for Earth’s inhabitants. Agriculture provides food for the “lifestyles” we enjoy because modern farming and forestry practices allow 99 percent of Americans to pursue other occupations, hobbies and volunteer activities. Without farmers providing “food for life,” our economy and culture would suffer. Food is essential. Out of necessity, people would forego science, art and other pursuits if they were forced to gather or hunt their own food. In this way, agriculture is foundational to civilization. Still, agriculture’s contributions to life continue to expand. Through biotechnology, farming is improving life around the world. Disease- and drought-resistant plants provide “food for life” in some of the poorest regions on the planet. Improved plant and animal breeding addresses nutritional and human health needs. Farms and forests generate alternative energy sources. And agricultural products are utilized every day in not only food, but also pharmaceuticals, textiles and industrial applications. Agriculture touches every aspect of our lives. From the clothes we wear and the food we eat, to the homes where we live and the cars we drive, agriculture and forest products are ever present. Farmers help conserve the resources we need and the nature we enjoy. As we celebrate National Ag Day and Farm-City Week, it’s a great opportunity to remember the diversity of “Agriculture: Food for Life.”

 

Call or email the 4-H Agent with any questions regarding this contest. (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu Office Hours 7:30am-12:00pm 12:30pm-4:00pm Monday-Friday

Garden Talk: Allergies gone wild – What’s Blowin’ in the Wind?

Photos courtesy of Herbal Academy

By Sallie Lee

Question:  My allergies, which normally give me a fit in spring and again to a lesser degree in the fall, seem to have started earlier this year and are driving me crazy!

What is with this allergy season?  I’m not imagining miserable itching watery eyes, runny nose, scratchy throat.  But for late August, this is weird! Is it that Goldenrod plant that seems to grow everywhere?  I’ve heard that’s the culprit in which case my weedeater is going to be wearing out every one of these plants that grow wild on my property.  Is there anything else I can do to get rid of the “guilty” plants?

Answer:  OK, for those who moved to Alabama during the last year or for those who have issues remembering, the word is Ragweed. Botanically known as Ambrosia spp, which sounds like a misnomer if ever there was one, this member of the Aster family becomes a topic of intense negativity about this time of year. Actually in most cases it’s a totally different  plant, Goldenrod (Solidago spp) that gets the bad rap and unfortunate eradication by misinformed homeowners and gardeners.

Why the disconnect and misdirected frustration?  Both Ragweed and Goldenrod bloom this time of year, from mid-August until “late fall.”  In addition to timing, they often grow in the same general conditions; full sun and average to slightly dry soil conditions.  The major difference between the two is that those pretty, yellow goldenrod flowers are insect pollinated while ragweed is wind pollinated.  That means to all allergy sufferers that while goldenrod pollen is heavy and sticky, just right for honeybee pollination, ragweed is wind pollinated. Considering that a single ragweed plant can produce 1 billion (yes, that many) grains of pollen per season, to paraphrase Bob Dylan, “the answer IS blowin’ in the wind.” Medical data indicates ragweed causes about 50% of all allergies blamed on pollen in North America.

This year has produced abundant flowers due in part to sufficient rainfall through most of our spring and summer.  Healthy plants produce more flowers, a boon in most gardens. But with ragweed, more flowers equal more pollen and so on, the “benefits” of which we’re currently reaping.

Other than waging war on stands of ragweed (see photos), we can take action to ameliorate ragweed’s impact on our health. Pollen counts are usually highest in the morning until about 10:00 am, so limiting outside activities during those hours can help. Conditions for enjoying the outdoors will be best right after a heavy rainfall. If you must be outdoors during heavy pollen outbursts, a facemask will help reduce exposure to pollen.

Goldenrod is a more noticeable plant so we tend to blame what is readily visible.  Goldenrod’s yellow flowers hold a nectar source that is attractive to bees including the “honey” kind and butterflies, often considered the last strong nectar source of the season for them.

Goldenrod has a fascinating history involving Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, and George Washington Carver, but that’s an article for another time.

If you’re not sure which one is growing in your yard, and it could be both, contact your county Extension office for help in determining whether or not you need to take action.

 

Garden Talk is written by Sallie Lee of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES). She is housed at the C. Beaty Hanna Horticultural and Environmental Center, which is based at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. This column includes research based information from land-grant universities around the country, including Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities. Email questions to Sallie at leesall@auburn.edu or call 205-879-6964 x11. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M University and Auburn University), is an equal opportunity educator and employer.  Everyone is welcome!

Practice Food Safety for a safe Labor Day!

Picnic and barbecue food often sits out in warm temperatures for quite a while, keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold to make sure you aren’t encouraging food-borne illness. Bring plenty of ice or frozen gel packs to your picnic or barbecue, along with coolers and insulated containers.

Follow these tips for a great safe meal.

– Barbecues and Picnics –
* Try to plan just the right amount of foods to take. That way, you
won’t have to worry about the storage or safety of leftovers.

* When taking foods off the grill, put them on a clean plate, not
the same platter that held raw meat.

* When preparing dishes like chicken or cooked meat salads, use
chilled ingredients. In other words, make sure your cooked
chicken has been cooked and chilled before it gets mixed with
other salad ingredients.

* It’s a good idea to use a separate cooler for drinks, so the one
containing perishable food won’t be constantly opened and closed.

* A cooler chest can also be used to keep hot food hot. Line the
cooler with a heavy kitchen towel for extra insulation and place
well wrapped hot foods inside. It’s amazing how long the foods
will stay not only warm, but hot. Try to use a cooler that is
just the right size to pack fairly tightly with hot food so
less heat escapes.

* Wash ALL fresh produce thoroughly. When preparing
lettuce, break into pieces – then wash.

Temperatures for cooking

165 degrees for 15 seconds Poultry–Chicken, Turkey,  Duck, whole or ground, Stuffing, stuffed meats or seafood and dishes prepared with previously cooked ingredients;

155 degrees for 15 seconds Ground Meat—including beef, pork, and other meat, Injected meat, Ground Seafood; and Eggs for hot-held service;

145 degrees for 15 seconds Steaks Chops—including pork, veal, and lamb; Eggs for immediate service;

145 degrees for 15 minutes Roasts including pork, beef, veal, and lamb;

135 degrees or hotter Commercially prepared ready-to-eat foods held for hot-held service; also use this temperature for fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes;

Also try these recipes.

 

RED WHITE AND BLUE PARFAIT

 

INGREDIENTS

BLUE BERRIES

STRAWBERRIES

YOGURT OF YOUR CHOICE

GRANOLA

 

IN A SMALL CLEAR CUP, PLACE STRAWBERRIES IN THE BOTOM OF THE CUP

ADD A LAYER OF YOGURT

ADD BLUEBERRIES NEXT

ADD A LAYER OF YOGURT

SPRINKLE GRANOLA ON TOP

SERVE

 

For Beef

  • Bay leaf
  • Marjoram
  • Nutmeg
  • Onion
  • Pepper
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Cumin

 

A combination of onion and pepper are the easiest and most used.

Bay leaf is easy to use but remember to remove the stem.

 

For your hamburgers use the tradition ranch flavored packets, by combining with the ground beef then preparing the hamburger patty.  Taco seasoning packets can also be used.

When preparing the burgers remember: once the patty is made place a thumb print in to the center, this allows even cooking.  Plus do not press or puncture the patty.  This will create a dry burger.

 

All-purpose Dry Rub – Mix 1 tsp cumin, 1 tsp oregano, 2 tsp garlic powder, 2 tsp onion powder, 1 Tbsp chili powder, 1 Tbsp salt, 1 Tbsp paprika, ¼ cup brown sugar ( Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows Beef)

Sweet & Spicy Hamburger Rub – Mix 3 Tbsp paprika, 1 Tbsp freshly ground black pepper, 1 Tbsp dark brown sugar, 2 tsp chili powder, 2 tsp onion powder, 1 tsp sea salt, 1 tsp cayenne pepper. ( Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows Beef)

 

 

CROCK POT BBQ (FOR CHICKEN, BEEF OR PORK)

 

 

1 BOTTLE BAR-BE-QUE SAUCE (CHOOSE THE FLAVOR YOUR FAMILY WILL LIKE)

ADD SEASONING OF CHOICE TO EITHER MEAT (OPTIONAL)

1 BONELESS CHICKEN BREAST PER PERSON OR

1 BONELESS PORKCHOP PER PERSON

½ – 1 CUP WATER

 

LINE CROCK POT WITH A CROCK POT LINER, (THIS WILL HELP WITH A FASTER CLEAN UP)

POUR WATER INTO CROCK POT

PLACE CHICKEN OR PORK IN WATER

POUR BAR-BE-QUE SAUCE ONTOP

PLACE LID ON TOP

TURN CROCK POT ON HIGH FOR 4-5 HOURS OR

TURN CROCK POT ON LOW FOR ALL DAY OR OVER NIGHT COOKING

SERVE

 

Fall 4-H Horse Camp October 21st

When: Saturday, October 21st, 2017 9:00am-3:00pm

Where: Alexandria Farms 850 Grady Williams Road Hamilton 35570

Ages: 9-18

Cost: $40

What To Wear: Long Pants, Boots/Tennis Shoes (NO open toed shoes)

Payment Due: Tuesday, October 17th by 4:00pm to the Marion County Extension Office 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570

Forms Completed by a parent/guardian: Friday, November 4th 4:00pm

REQUIRED FORMS: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/Horse-Camp-Forms-and-Directions.pdf

Map from Marion County 4-H Office: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2016/10/Map.pdf

                        *Make checks payable to: Allie Trentham *

For more information call or email the Marion County Extension Office 205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu Open Mon.-Fri. 7:30AM-4:00PM 372 7th Ave. SW Hamilton, AL 35570 For more specific Horse Camp questions you can call Allie Trentham (205)495-2830