Upcoming Events



2018 4-H Sweet Potato Fundraiser

40 lb. box-$20 

Download ORDER Form: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/09/SweetPotatoFlyerHLE.pdf

Pre-orders only. Deadline to order is November 2nd, 2018.  Make checks/money orders payable to Alabama 4-H Foundation when you place your order. Checks or money orders preferred. Pick-up from November 15th-16th at the Marion County Extension Office 7th Avenue SW, Hamilton, AL 35570.

The 4-Her with the most sales will win a cash prize!

Drop by the Marion County Extension Office to place an order or you may mail your order to the Extension Office (payment in the mail by October 22nd).

For more information call or email the 4-H Agent at (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu . Office Hours Monday-Friday 7:30am-4:00pm Address: 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570.

All proceeds go toward educational programming for 4-H in-school clubs and 4-H Events (RiverKids, Shooting Sports, Robotics, In-school clubs, Youth Council, Pet Show, Etc.). 

2018 Farm-City Contest

Marion County Rules: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/09/Farm-City-2018-Rules.pdf

State Rules: http://alabamafarmcity.org/

County Prizes Provided by the Marion County ALFA Farmer’s Federation

1st Place $50.00

2nd Place $25.00

3rd Place $15.00

**ALL submissions must be made to the Marion County Extension Office by October 31st, 2018. The Marion County Farm City Committee will select the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners. 1st Place work will be submitted by the Marion County Committee for state submission. **

DUE: You can turn in your entry at your scheduled 4-H club meeting or drop off your entry by October 31st, 2018 to the Marion County Extension Office.

The Alabama Territory was carved out of the Mississippi Territory in 1817, and Alabama was admitted to the Union as the 22nd state Dec. 14, 1819. In those days, farming was the way of life for, the majority, of Alabamians, but the interdependence between urban and rural communities was already evident. Cities sprang up along major waterways, which farmers relied on to ship goods from land-locked areas to worldwide markets via the Port of Mobile. In the past 200 years, technology has transformed Alabama’s agricultural footprint and its cityscapes. The old mule and plow have been replaced by GPS-enabled tractors and cover crops. Farmers have embraced the importance of crop rotation and agricultural diversification to conserve soil nutrients and protect against market fluctuations. The former “Cotton State” now produces a vast array of agricultural products-from timber, beef, pork and poultry to fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, corn and soybeans. The once bustling riverfronts teeming with farmers, merchants and traders have grown into densely populated city centers with towering skyscrapers. Today, numerous city-dwellers never drive past or walk by a working farm. Regardless of a person’s chosen career-be it lawyer, doctor, mechanic, banker, teacher or scientist-everyone relies on agriculture for food, clothing, shelter and much more. We celebrate the contributions of our state’s farmers over the past 200 years.

Call the Extension Office with any questions. (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

Open Monday-Friday 7:30am-12:00pm & 12:30pm-4:00pm

372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570

 

2018 4-H Summer Day Camps

All Marion County 4-H Events are open to all youth in Marion County Ages 9-18 years old. Alabama 4-H and Auburn University require that all youth be at least 9 years old as of January 1st, 2018 in order to participate in any 4-H Events.

JUNE:

2 Day RiverKids Event Cost: $5

JUNE 6: 8:30am-11:30am Meet at the Extension Office. Lunch Provided.

JUNE 7: 9:00am-12:00pm RiverKids Float (Location Disclosed June 6th)

2 Day RiverKids Event Cost: $5

JUNE 14: 8:30am-11:30am Meet at the Extension Office. Lunch Provided.

JUNE 15: 9:00am-11:30am RiverKids Float (Location Disclosed June 14th)

2 Day RiverKids Event Cost: $5

JUNE 21: 8:30am-11:30am Meet at the Extension Office. Lunch Provided.

JUNE 22: 9:00am-1:00pm RiverKids Float (Location Disclosed June 21st)

REQUIRED FORMS: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/05/Summer-Day-Camp-Forms-1.pdf

FLYER: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/05/2018-Summer-Day-Camp-Flyer-1.pdf

JULY :

JULY 9th: Painting/Art Day Camp Cost: $5 (Spaces are first come, first serve)

8:30am-12:30pm Supplies and Lunch Provided.

Come enjoy a day of painting with Mandi Sexton and the 4-H Agent.

JULY 11th: Archery/Wildlife Day Camp Cost: $5  (Spaces are first come, first

11:30am-3:00pm Supplies and Lunch Provided.

Come try Archery with the Hamilton Parks and Recreation staff and learn about wildlife conservation with Matt Brock , Wildlife Biologist

JULY 12th: Cooking Day Camp Cost: $5   (Spaces are first come, first serve)

8:30am-12:30pm Supplies, Lunch, and Snacks Provided.

Come cook your own lunch and snack with Susan Hill, Food Safety Regional Extension Agent

JULY 13th: Cupcake Decorating Day Camp Cost: $5  (Spaces are first come, first serve)

8:30am-12:30pm Supplies and Lunch Provided.

Learn cake/cupcake decorating basics and take home your own baked treats!

**The Alabama Cooperative Extension system encourages qualified persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities. If you anticipate needing any type of accommodation or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact Rebecca Danley at (205)921-3551 in advance of your participation or visit. **

REQUIRED FORMS: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/05/Summer-Day-Camp-Forms.pdf

FLYER: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/05/2018-Summer-Day-Camp-Flyer.pdf

Call or email the 4-H Agent with any questions. Spaces will be filled on a first paid, first served basis. (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

 

 

Watching the Temperatures Change

Watching the Temperatures Change

I like winter.  Maybe it is because I was born in Michigan where winter comes early and stays late, or it is because I am warm-natured.  I do not know why, but I like winter.  Now that I went out on the limb with my inclination towards winter, let me qualify.  Few of us, myself included, like the single digit temperatures and 20mph winds we had earlier this month.  Most of my Northern friends were also miserable as they endured temperatures in the negative teens and wind chills in the negative thirties, forties, or fifties.  Those conditions are not only miserable; they are deadly.  What I want my Alabama friends to understand is that the miserable times come with the storms, and the pleasant times are in between.

Early in December, we received a freak snowstorm in the State.  Snow fell from the Gulf Coast to the Tennessee line.  At my little cabin in the Talladega woods, I received three or four inches of the early wet stuff.  It was beautiful.  My Buster dog and I had an enjoyable few days as we hiked alone through the mountains.  It was a wet snow, and the flakes were large.  This is typical of early and late season snows.  In Buffalo, NY where I lived in the nineties, this snow would occur in October and April.  This is a dangerous snow.  The weight of the moisture content in the snow broke many limbs out of my large pines, and snapped my ten-foot saplings in two.  On Columbus Day 2005, a snow like this hit Buffalo while the trees still had their colorful leaves attached.  Branches and trees came crashing to the ground; causing Western New York to shut down.  Disaster Relief chainsaw crews from around the nation converged on Buffalo as the city had to dig out of the snow and cut up a hurricane-style tree mess.

Since that December 2017, snow melted, Birmingham has enjoyed the typical winter weather and the fluctuations of mercury within the thermometer.  Many nights we had a couple of extra quilts on our bed only to wake to a cold house wanting for need of a fire.  However, a few nights we opened the windows and enjoyed a cool not cold 50-degree night.  Last week in mid-January, God blessed us with another snow.  Temperatures were colder than the first snow, so this snow was a powder.  Again, the wind was blowing, so that part of the storm smarted, but the snow was so light and dry, I went outside and swept our porch and sidewalks clean.  At the cabin, we ended up with about 1½ to 2” of snow.  Sure, it was an inconvenience for a few days, but everything closed; leave your car parked and enjoy the long weekend.  Think about it, we received the snow on Tuesday and Wednesday, by Saturday, all of the snow was gone and we had highs in the 60s.  Yesterday we hit 72 at the cabin!  Even in Philadelphia, at the NFC Championship game, they had a balmy 47-degree temperature at kickoff.

This is why I like winter the weather changes.  Even in the northern states, the temperature fluctuates.  As we were experiencing the snow of last week, my relatives in Michigan were looking at grass.  As the coldest part of winter, approaches on Groundhog’s Day try not to complain.  Go with the flow.  What is here today will probably be gone tomorrow.  Do not let the sensationalism of television news worry you to a tizzy.  Embrace the change, remember, this summer we will have ‘weeks’ of daytime temperatures in the high 90s with lows in the mid-70s with no change in sight.

Garden Talk is written by Andrew J. Baril of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, C. Beaty Hanna Horticulture & Environmental Center, which is based at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens.  This column includes research-based information from land-grant universities around the country, including Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities.  Email questions to ajb0012@auburn.edu, or call 205 879-6964. Learn more about what is going on in Jefferson County by visiting the ACES website, www.aces.edu/Jefferson or checking us on Facebook and Twitter.  The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities), is an equal opportunity employer and educator.  Everyone is welcome!

December 4-H Newsletter

Check out the December 4-H Newsletter to see what’s coming up for Marion County 4-H’ers: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/12/December-2017-4-H-Newsletter.pdf 

Contact the Marion County Extension Office (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu for questions.

November 4-H Newsletter

4-H Horse Camp Participants

Check out the November 4-H Newsletter to see what’s coming up for Marion County 4-H’ers: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/11/November-2017-4-H-Newsletter.pdf

Contact the Marion County Extension Office (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu for questions.

2017 Farm City Poster, Essay, and Multimedia Contest

Marion County Rules: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/Combined-Rules-1.pdf

State Rules: http://alabamafarmcity.org/

County Prizes Provided by the Marion County ALFA Farmer’s Federation

1st Place $50.00

2nd Place $25.00

3rd Place $15.00

**ALL submissions must be made to the Marion County Extension Office by October 31st, 2017. The Marion County Farm City Committee will select the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners. 1st Place work will be submitted by the Marion County Committee for state submission. **

DUE: October 31st, 2017 to the Marion County Extension Office.

The Alabama Farm-City Committee is excited once again to offer a Multimedia Contest, Poster Contest and Essay Contest to Marion County Youth. The contest is sponsored by Alabama Farmers Cooperative and complements the Farm-City poster and essay contests by providing students another channel to express their creativity. The 2017 theme for all three contests is “Agriculture: Food for Life.” The 2017 National Ag Day and Farm-City Week theme of “Agriculture: Food for Life” captures the essence of farming. No other industry or activity is more connected to “life” than agriculture. Farmers produce the grains, protein, fruit, vegetables, nuts and dairy products that sustain life. The food we eat is literally fuel for our bodies. Without it, life would be unsustainable. But agriculture is intertwined to “life” in other ways, too. Private farms and forestland provide habitat and food for wildlife, and support the lives of all nature’s creatures. Through conservation and environmental stewardship, farmers protect the life-giving water, air and soil on which we all depend. Life, however, is not merely a physical existence. It’s also emotional and spiritual experiences, working together to provide a healthy, well-balanced life for Earth’s inhabitants. Agriculture provides food for the “lifestyles” we enjoy because modern farming and forestry practices allow 99 percent of Americans to pursue other occupations, hobbies and volunteer activities. Without farmers providing “food for life,” our economy and culture would suffer. Food is essential. Out of necessity, people would forego science, art and other pursuits if they were forced to gather or hunt their own food. In this way, agriculture is foundational to civilization. Still, agriculture’s contributions to life continue to expand. Through biotechnology, farming is improving life around the world. Disease- and drought-resistant plants provide “food for life” in some of the poorest regions on the planet. Improved plant and animal breeding addresses nutritional and human health needs. Farms and forests generate alternative energy sources. And agricultural products are utilized every day in not only food, but also pharmaceuticals, textiles and industrial applications. Agriculture touches every aspect of our lives. From the clothes we wear and the food we eat, to the homes where we live and the cars we drive, agriculture and forest products are ever present. Farmers help conserve the resources we need and the nature we enjoy. As we celebrate National Ag Day and Farm-City Week, it’s a great opportunity to remember the diversity of “Agriculture: Food for Life.”

 

Call or email the 4-H Agent with any questions regarding this contest. (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu Office Hours 7:30am-12:00pm 12:30pm-4:00pm Monday-Friday

Fall 4-H Horse Camp October 21st

When: Saturday, October 21st, 2017 9:00am-3:00pm

Where: Alexandria Farms 850 Grady Williams Road Hamilton 35570

Ages: 9-18

Cost: $40

What To Wear: Long Pants, Boots/Tennis Shoes (NO open toed shoes)

Payment Due: Tuesday, October 17th by 4:00pm to the Marion County Extension Office 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570

Forms Completed by a parent/guardian: Friday, November 4th 4:00pm

REQUIRED FORMS: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/Horse-Camp-Forms-and-Directions.pdf

Map from Marion County 4-H Office: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2016/10/Map.pdf

                        *Make checks payable to: Allie Trentham *

For more information call or email the Marion County Extension Office 205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu Open Mon.-Fri. 7:30AM-4:00PM 372 7th Ave. SW Hamilton, AL 35570 For more specific Horse Camp questions you can call Allie Trentham (205)495-2830

 

October 4-H Newsletter

 4-H Youth Council Members from our October Youth Council Meeting

Check out the October 4-H Newsletter to see what’s coming up for Marion County 4-H’ers: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/10/October-2017-4-H-Newsletter.pdf

Contact the Marion County Extension Office (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu for questions.

September 4-H Newsletter

Check out the September 4-H Newsletter to see what’s coming up for Marion County 4-H’ers: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/09/September-2017-4-H-Newsletter.pdf

Contact the Marion County Extension Office (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu for questions.