Fall into Health Eating

Perhaps we eat more simply because bathing suit season is over, and we can start hiding excess calories beneath our winter clothes. Whatever the reason, it’s important to realize that fall foods (soups, stews, breads, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, apples, pumpkins and all types of greens) can actually be healthier than foods of other seasons. They are typically packed with great nutrients, such as fiber, protein, beta carotene and vitamin C. Here are a few tips to keep the fall tasty and healthy:

Soups are great for you if they’re not made with cream or cheese. Just watch serving sizes–we tend to eat whatever’s in our bowls.

Stews can be hearty and fattening. Use loads of fresh vegetables, and go light on the meat and potatoes.

Avoid unconscious eating while watching football and the new fall TV lineup. Never bring the whole bag or bowl of anything to the couch or coffee table–pre-measure it in the kitchen beforehand. When it comes to chips, make sure they’re baked, not fried.

For pizza, watch the toppings–they can double the calories.

Celebrate the fall harvest in other ways besides making pies. Apples are low in calories when they’re off the tree, not in a pie.

If it’s got to be pie, try making pumpkin pie with artificial sweetener, egg whites and low-fat milk. And of course, just have one piece. Keep in mind that pumpkin seeds have about 300 calories per 1/4 cup.

Turkey is healthy, as long as you keep it lean and white.

Get out and enjoy the fall weather. The air is cooler, the leaves are turning and the countryside becomes more scenic. It’s the perfect time to go outdoors and do something: Take walks on the beach or by the lake; go to the zoo; or ride a bike.

Keep in mind that once we set the clocks back, it gets darker earlier, so there are fewer outdoor options for physical activities in the evening. Make adjustments by joining a gym, planning evening walks at the mall or becoming an early riser.

 

Taco Soup

2 lb. ground beef, browned and drained

1 onion, chopped

1 package taco mix

1 package ranch dressing mix

1 large can diced tomatoes (undrained)

1 can whole kernel corn (undrained)

1 can diced tomatoes and green chilies

1 can chili beans (undrained

1 can black beans (drained and washed)

Combine, cook, and serve. This is good for a large crowd.

The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M University and Auburn University), is an equal opportunity educator and employer.  Everyone is welcome!

 Elaine Softley, MS, Home Science Agent II, Family Nutrition and Health

Alabama Cooperative Extension System

2018 4-H Sweet Potato Fundraiser

40 lb. box-$20 

Download ORDER Form: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/09/SweetPotatoFlyerHLE.pdf

Pre-orders only. Deadline to order is November 2nd, 2018.  Make checks/money orders payable to Alabama 4-H Foundation when you place your order. Checks or money orders preferred. Pick-up from November 15th-16th at the Marion County Extension Office 7th Avenue SW, Hamilton, AL 35570.

The 4-Her with the most sales will win a cash prize!

Drop by the Marion County Extension Office to place an order or you may mail your order to the Extension Office (payment in the mail by October 22nd).

For more information call or email the 4-H Agent at (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu . Office Hours Monday-Friday 7:30am-4:00pm Address: 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570.

All proceeds go toward educational programming for 4-H in-school clubs and 4-H Events (RiverKids, Shooting Sports, Robotics, In-school clubs, Youth Council, Pet Show, Etc.). 

2018 Farm-City Contest

Marion County Rules: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2018/09/Farm-City-2018-Rules.pdf

State Rules: http://alabamafarmcity.org/

County Prizes Provided by the Marion County ALFA Farmer’s Federation

1st Place $50.00

2nd Place $25.00

3rd Place $15.00

**ALL submissions must be made to the Marion County Extension Office by October 31st, 2018. The Marion County Farm City Committee will select the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners. 1st Place work will be submitted by the Marion County Committee for state submission. **

DUE: You can turn in your entry at your scheduled 4-H club meeting or drop off your entry by October 31st, 2018 to the Marion County Extension Office.

The Alabama Territory was carved out of the Mississippi Territory in 1817, and Alabama was admitted to the Union as the 22nd state Dec. 14, 1819. In those days, farming was the way of life for, the majority, of Alabamians, but the interdependence between urban and rural communities was already evident. Cities sprang up along major waterways, which farmers relied on to ship goods from land-locked areas to worldwide markets via the Port of Mobile. In the past 200 years, technology has transformed Alabama’s agricultural footprint and its cityscapes. The old mule and plow have been replaced by GPS-enabled tractors and cover crops. Farmers have embraced the importance of crop rotation and agricultural diversification to conserve soil nutrients and protect against market fluctuations. The former “Cotton State” now produces a vast array of agricultural products-from timber, beef, pork and poultry to fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, corn and soybeans. The once bustling riverfronts teeming with farmers, merchants and traders have grown into densely populated city centers with towering skyscrapers. Today, numerous city-dwellers never drive past or walk by a working farm. Regardless of a person’s chosen career-be it lawyer, doctor, mechanic, banker, teacher or scientist-everyone relies on agriculture for food, clothing, shelter and much more. We celebrate the contributions of our state’s farmers over the past 200 years.

Call the Extension Office with any questions. (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

Open Monday-Friday 7:30am-12:00pm & 12:30pm-4:00pm

372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570