Upcoming Events



Fig Rust

Fig Rust

Kerry Stober 9/14/2017

Question: The leaves on my fig tree are covered in brown spots and some are falling off. What can I do?

The most likely culprit of these symptoms is a common fungal disease called Fig Rust, caused by the fungus Cerotelium fici. The good news is this disease only occurs on the leaves and should not damage the fruit. Rust usually attacks younger leaves first. You may start to see yellowish spots, which then get bigger and turn into a brownish color all over the leaves. There also can be raised brown spots or lesions on the underside of the leaves. Over time, these leaves will turn completely yellow, followed by becoming brown and curled, and then falling off of the plant. Rust usually begins appearing in the late summer and, when severe, it can cause the tree to lose leaves very rapidly. This disease and loss of leaves will not kill the tree, but when it occurs many seasons in a row, you may see a reduction in yield of fruit. Rainy weather can cause this disease to be more prevalent, and unfortunately we had a particularly rainy summer followed by a series of wet tropical storms. Figs produce their best fruit in a climate with warm dry summers and cool wet winters.

Spraying to control this disease presents a bit of a problem, as there are no fungicides currently labeled for figs in Alabama. As a result, your best methods of control are going to be using cultural methods of sanitation and pruning. Prune out infected areas and rake up older dropped leaves, disposing of them by bagging or burning. You can also prune the tree to open up areas to more airflow throughout, as moist enclosed areas are more likely to become diseased.  These methods will not completely defeat this disease, but can reduce its effect on your plant’s overall health. If you water your fig plants regularly, try to avoid spraying the leaves, as we learned earlier water plays a large factor in fig rust appearance. You can also add mulch around the tree and fertilize in the spring to help keep it healthy.

The fig is a hardy tree with relatively few pest and disease issues. Keeping the area around your tree clean plays a huge role in keeping their most common pests at bay. Hopefully by following the methods, you will see less spots on your tree next year!

“Garden Talk is written by Kerry Stober of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES). She is housed at the C. Beaty Hanna Horticultural and Environmental Center, which is based at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. This column includes research based information from land-grant universities around the country, including Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities. Email questions to Kerry at KDS0010@aces.edu or call 205-879-6964 x19. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M University and Auburn University), is an equal opportunity educator and employer.  Everyone is welcome!

2017 Marion County 4-H Pet Show

4-H Pet Show

Marion County 4-H Pet Show

When? October 14th, 2017 Starting at 9:00AM-Until

Where? Tractor Supply Company Store 1500 Military St S #1, Hamilton, AL 35570

View Photos from the 2016  Event: https://www.facebook.com/pg/marioncountyal4h/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1618442285116035

Flyer: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/2017-4-H-Pet-Show-Flyer.pdf

PET SHOW DIVISIONS AND CATEGORIES TO ENTER:

DOGS 

_____ Costume Contest

______Largest

_____Smallest (adult, no puppies)

CATS

_____ Costume Contest

______Largest

_____Smallest (adult, no kittens)

RABBITS

_____ Costume Contest

______Largest

_____Smallest (adult)

BIRDS

_____Best Color

_____Most Vocal

_____Largest

FISH

_____Best Color

_____Most Unusual

OTHER PETS

_____Most Unusual

_____Most Like Owner

_____Costume Contest

 

Marion County 4-H Pet Show RULES

1. All pets MUST be in cages or restrained on a leash.

2. Youth CAN bring up to 3 pets.

3. Youth/animal MUST sign in upon arrival. Any youth ages 9-18 are welcome to participate. Show up before 9:00am to register.

4. Check the website/social media pages or call the Extension Office for location and times of the event.

5. No wildlife or farm animal of any kind will be permitted on site.

6. All animals must be healthy and show no signs of sickness or disease.

7. No aggressive behavior will be tolerated. If your animal cannot be controlled you will be asked to leave.

8. Each pet entry will be evaluated based upon how close the pet meets the subcategory standards.

9. All judges’ decisions are final.

10. All participants MUST be prepared to talk to the judges about their pets.

11. There must be a minimum of two entries per class in a division OR the class will be cancelled.

12. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System, Marion County 4-H, and Hamilton Tractor Supply Company Store will not be held responsible for any accident or loss that may occur to any animal, person, or vehicle, nor damage to any property.

13. In case of rain or inclement weather the show will be held at the Hamilton Recreation Center Pavilion across from the Marion County Courthouse Annex where the Extension office is located.
Call or Email the 4-H Agent is you have any questions (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT: Marion County Humane Society

Marion County 4-H is partnering with the Marion County Humane Society for this year’s 4-H Community Service Project. Please consider helping this worthy organization by bringing some of the items from the list below or provide monetary donations to this organization. If you can’t give items you can always give of your time. Contact the Marion County Humane Society to see how you can help today! (205) 924-3648  or mchsteammember@gmail.com Marion County 4-H will have bins set up at the 4-H Pet Show scheduled for October 14th ready to take your items to the Humane Society.  The 4-H Agent will also bring a list of items to each 4-H in-school meeting to help collect items for the Humane Society.

Items you can Donate to help:

Collars, Harnesses, Puppy Food, Kitten Food, Kitty Litter, Cedar Shavings, Dog Toys, Cat Toys, Bleach, Laundry Detergent, Crate Liners, Dog/Cat beds, Treats, Dog Houses-used or new, and Monetary gifts are always welcome to help purchase pet medications and needed supplies.

 

**Check our website (www.aces.edu) Facebook , Instagram, or Twitter Pages to stay up to date on all Marion County 4-H News and Events. Call/email your 4-H Agent with any questions: Mrs. Danley (205)921-3551 or  rgd0007@aces.edu

Youth Council Meeting October 3rd, 2017 5:30pm

 

Are you interested in Leadership? Come to our first Marion County 4-H Youth Council Meeting of the 2017-2018 4-H Club Year! This year’s Youth Council will plan upcoming 4-H events and activities, participate in Leadership activities, conduct community service projects, and brainstorm fun games/activities to include at this year’s 4-H County Round-Up in April! Youth Council members will serve as Marion County 4-H Ambassadors that promote 4-H in the schools and at local events. We will elect youth council officers that will preside at County Round-Up at our first meeting. Refreshments will be served.

When: Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017 5:30pm (please call/email by Friday, September 29th to reserve your spot)

Where: Marion County Extension Office 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570 (across the street from the Hamilton Recreation Center)

If you would like to attend this Leadership Event please call/email the 4-H Agent by Friday, September 29th, so that we can better prepare! We hope to see you on October 3rd!

Marion County Extension Office Hours 7:30am-4:00pm Monday-Friday

Address: 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570

4-H Agent, Rebecca Danley (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu

Tailgating Food Safety 2017 – Stay in the Zone

Tailgating Food Safety 2017 Stay in the Zone

Maintain your playing field

Bring enough coolers to keep your food safe.

  •   A cooler for raw foods and a cooler for cooked foods

Stick to the game plan

  • Keep your food prep area clean
  • Keep your food and equipment separate
  • Cook your foods to the correct temperature
  • Keep your foods chilled

Defend against bacteria

Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold

Use a food thermometer to check temperatures

Put your food away after two hours

To win the game

  • When in doubt throw it out

 Chicken Taco Soup

Ingredients:

1 pound boneless skinless chicken, cooked and shredded
2 cups cooked pinto beans
2 cups prepared salsa
6 cups chicken stock
1 packet taco seasoning
2 cups tortilla chips, crushed

2 cups shredded cheese for topping(optional)

Directions:

1. Combine chicken, beans, salsa, stock and seasoning in a 2 quart soup pot.
2. Bring to a boil and reduce heat until soup is simmering.
3. Let cook for 15 to 20 minutes so flavors blend well.
4. Top each bowl of soup with crushed tortilla chips.

ANGEL FLUFF CAKE

Ingredients:

1 can (20 oz.) Crushed Pineapple, in juice, undrained

2 pkg.  small (1.5 oz.) Pistachio Flavor Fat Free Sugar Free Instant Pudding

1 cup thawed LITE or Sugar Free Whipped Topping

1pkg.  (10 oz.) round angel food cake, cut horizontally into 3 layers

10  fresh strawberries or frozen sliced strawberries

Directions:

MIX pineapple and dry pudding mix in medium bowl with whisk until well blended. Stir in whipped topping.

STACK cake layers on plate, filling layers and topping with pudding mixture.

REFRIGERATE 1 hour. Top with berries just before serving.  (Source:KRAFT.com)

 

Caramel Apple Nachos

Ingredients

3 green granny smith apples, cored and sliced

3 red apples, cored and sliced
5 oz. caramel topping

5 oz. chocolate topping
1/4 cup chopped peanuts
2 Tablespoons mini chocolate chips

Directions

  1. PLACE SLICED APPLES ON A PLATTER OF CHOICE
    2.  Drizzle caramel TOPPING AND CHOCOLATE TOPPING OVER SLICED APPLES
    3.  Sprinkle with chopped peanuts and mini chocolate chips
  2. MICROWAVE FOR 15-20 SECONDS ONLY
  3. SERVE

EASY MARASCHINO CHERRY FRUIT DIP

INGREDEINTS

1  8 OZ. PACKAGE OF CREAM CHEESE, SOFTENED

1 16 OZ. CONTAINER MARSHMALLOW CREAM

1 TABLESPOON MARASCHINO CHERRY JUICE

DIRECTIONS

  1. PLACE CREAM CHEESE AND MARSHMALLOW CREAM IN A  LARGE MIXING BOWL
  2. MIX WITH ELECTIRIC OR HAND HELD MIXER
  3. ADD MARASCHINO CHERRY JUICE
  4. MIX BY HAND
  5. EMPTY DIP INTO SERVING DISH OR INDIVIDUAL DISHES
  6. SERVE

BACON TATOR BOMBS

INGREDIENTS

1 SMALL BAG TATOR TOTS; THAWED

1 PACKAGE THIN SLICED BACON

1 CUP SHREDDED CHEDDAR CHEESE MILD OR SHARP

DIRECTIONS

  1. PREHEAT OVEN TO 400º
  2. POUR TATOR TOTS INTO A LARGE BOWL
  3. REMOVE BACON FROM PACKAGE
  4. SEPARATE EACH SLICE OR BACON
  5. CUT EACH BACON SLICE IN HALF
  6. PLACE ONTO A COOKIE SHEET OR BAKING DISH
  7. PLACE TATOR TOT AT ONE END OF A SLICE OF BACON
  8. WRAP BACON AROUND TATOR TOT
  9. REPEAT UNTIL TATOR TOTS ARE WRAPPED
  10. BAKE WRAPPED TOTS AND BACON FOR 15 MINUTES OR UNTIL BACON IS CRISPY
  11. CAREFULL REMOVE BACON WRAPPED TOTS FROM BAKING SHEET AND PLACE ONTO SERVING PLATTER
  12. SPRINKLE SHREDDED CHEESE ONTOP BACON WRAPPED TOTS
  13. SERVE

YUMMY VEGETABLE DIP VEGETABLE TRAY WITH CHEESE

INGREDIENTS

1 PACKAGE VEGETABLE MIX OF CHOICE

½ CUP MAYONNAISE OR PLAIN YOGURT

1 16OZ CONTAINER SOUR CREAM (REGULAR, LOWFAT, OR FAT FREE)

DIRECTIONS

  1. MIX ALL INGREDIENTS IN A MEDIUM MIXING BOWL
  2. SET ASIDE

INGREDIENTS

1 LARGE GREEN PEPPER

1 PACKAGE BROCOLLI FLOWERETTES

1 PACKAGE CAULIFLOWERETTES

1 SMALL BAG BABY CARROTS

2 SLICED CUCUMBERS

2 SMALL CONTAINERS GRAPE TOMATOES

4 CELERY STALKS CUT INTO 3 INCH PIECES

2 BAGS CUBED CHEDDAR CHEESE

1 BAG SNOW PEAS

Lawn Burweed – Preventing the Prickly Pest

Photo courtesy of Alabama Extension

  1. Last spring, I noticed our family dog almost tip-toeing through the yard. He acted like something was pricking his feet.  When I walked in the same area, I realized that he wasn’t just acting!!  Whatever it was pricked my feet too!  On closer inspection, I found this weed that had small stickers all over it.  What is this weed and how can I prevent it from being a problem next spring?
  2. Ah – the infamous lawn burweed! As you discovered, it is a menace to man and beast alike!  I am thrilled that you asked this question now, because this time of year is the perfect time to start your plan of attack!

Lawn burweed (Soliva sessilis) is a winter annual that germinates throughout thin turf in the fall months as temperatures cool.  It is small and not very noticeable during the cold winter months. However, as temperatures warm in the early spring, lawn burweed initiates a period of rapid growth and begins to form spine-tipped burs at the base of each leaf. The seed is contained within the hooked bur.

Now that you know what it is, the most important question remains – how can you get rid of it?  The best strategy in controlling lawn burweed is to apply a preemergence herbicide, containing the active ingredients atrazine or isoxaben in late September to early October, before the winter weeds germinate. This method will kill it upon sprouting and greatly reduce its presence in your yard next spring.  One point to mention – these products are available in either a granular or liquid form.  Granular products require ½ inch of rainfall or irrigation to become active.

Just in case you have a few weeds that escape the preemergence herbicide (which is not unusual), you can also spot spray with a postemergence herbicide.  The key to success is to treat between November and February, when lawn burweed is very small and much easier to control.  During this time, the weed has yet to develop the spine-tipped burs.  Spray your lawn with a postemergence herbicide containing the active ingredients of three broadleaf weed killers: 2,4-D, dicamba, and mecoprop (MCPP).  Many brands of broadleaf herbicides on the shelf contain these ingredients.  Using the herbicide 2-4-D alone may not be quite as effective, so a three-in-one product is preferred.  Keep in mind that broadleaf herbicides are not effective unless applied when the air temperature is above 68 °F.  The window of opportunity can be very limited during the winter season.  Again, another reason to use pre-emergence herbicides in the fall.

Unfortunately, most people do not notice a lawn burweed problem until warmer temperatures arrive.  However, waiting until spring is too late.  If you delay until April or May to attempt lawn burweed control, you are fighting a losing battle.  Once the weed has reached a more mature state, multiple herbicide applications may be necessary, which can increase the potential for turfgrass injury.  Because lawn burweed is a winter annual, it will begin to succumb to the warmer air temperatures (~90 °F); however, the spines have already formed and will remain after the weed withers and dies.  Mowing the area at a very low height and bagging the seeds might offer some relief.

Some severe situations may call for killing the entire area, including the turfgrass, with a non-selective herbicide, such as glyphosate.  Of course, one will have to replant grass or lay new sod but this method may be worth it, since it will ensure no more lawn burweed!

Dead or alive, lawn burweed poses a painful problem. The only solution is early identification and control.  Remember lawn burweed is an annual and will come back from seeds that develop each spring. Take action now for prickle-free turf later!

 “Garden Talk is written by Bethany A. O’Rear of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES). She is housed at the C. Beaty Hanna Horticultural and Environmental Center, which is based at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. This column includes research based information from land-grant universities around the country, including Alabama A&M and Auburn Universities. Email questions to Bethany at Bethany@aces.edu or call 205-879-6964 x15. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M University and Auburn University), is an equal opportunity educator and employer.  Everyone is welcome!

 

2017 4-H Sweet Potato Fundraiser

40 lb. box-$20 

Download ORDER Form: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/08/SweetPotatoFlyerHLE.pdf

Pre-orders only. Deadline to order is November 1st, 2017.  Make checks/money orders payable to Alabama 4-H Foundation when you place your order. Checks or money orders preferred. Pick-up from November 16-17 at the Marion County Extension Office 7th Avenue SW, Hamilton, AL 35570.

The 4-Her with the most sales will win a cash prize!

Drop by the Marion County Extension Office to place an order or you may mail your order to the Extension Office (payment in the mail by October 27th).

For more information call or email the 4-H Agent at (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu . Office Hours Monday-Friday 7:30am-4:00pm Address: 372 7th Avenue SW Hamilton, AL 35570.

All proceeds go toward educational programming for 4-H in-school clubs and 4-H Events (RiverKids, Shooting Sports, Pet Show, Etc.).  

 

September 4-H Newsletter

Check out the September 4-H Newsletter to see what’s coming up for Marion County 4-H’ers: http://offices.aces.edu/marion/wp-content/uploads/sites/56/2017/09/September-2017-4-H-Newsletter.pdf

Contact the Marion County Extension Office (205)921-3551 or rgd0007@aces.edu for questions.